Norwegian Utility Re-Dimensioned Insulation in Voltage Upgrade Project

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Norwegian power utility, Statnett, operates a network of over 10,000 km of overhead lines from 132 to 420 kV. Recent changes in power flow made it necessary to increase capacity so, like many transmission system operators, Statnett is working towards building the next generation grid. Given public opposition to new lines and the difficulty in obtaining additional right of ways, this is being accomplished in large part through a program of upgrading existing lines – apparently one of the largest projects of its kind anywhere. By the time the project has been completed in 2030, the length of the 420 kV system will have grown more than three-fold to 7,500 km. Similarly, there are some 5,500 km of 300 kV lines of which circa 1500 km have twin conductor bundles. The plan is to upgrade these to 420 kV, in the process boosting line capacity by about 40% while keeping existing towers and conductors.

In order to optimize insulation coordination for the upgraded lines, a systematic program of research was carried out into icing and pollution behavior of different insulators options. Lightning and switching performance of both the insulators and air gaps was also undertaken, both in the laboratory and in the field. The goal was to minimize the required extension of existing insulators and to keep air clearances to a minimum in order to ensure the lowest incremental visual impact from the voltage upgrade. This INMR article from 2012, contributed by Sonja Berlijn of Statnett as well as Igor Gutman and Jan Lundquist of STRI, reviewed the tests and programs required for re-dimensioning the voltage upgraded lines, which in many ways proved a greater technical challenge than designing new lines. 


Most voltage upgrading projects in recent years have involved maintaining existing towers and conductors with the main change being rather in line insulation. Either existing insulator strings are made longer, e.g. by adding discs (see Fig, 1) or one insulator configuration is replaced with one of a different type (e.g. as in a ‘V’ string or braced line post being substituted for an existing ‘I’ string). For example, in order to comply with the insulation level required for a 420 kV line, 300 kV ‘I’ strings would typically need to be extended from 14 to 18 standard (21 ton) glass discs, having a total string length of between 3.5 and 3.6 m. At the same time, the required basic clearance for this insulation level would have to be 2.8 m, according to the EN 50341 European standard. Considering that clearances to cross-arms and guy wires for typical 300 kV towers in Norway are only 2.4 m, it was obvious from the start that such an upgrade would not be easily implemented. With this limitation in mind, Statnett engineers began to ask some basic questions: Could insulator strings be made shorter and, if so, by how much? Moreover, if insulator strings could be shortened from the expected circa 3.5 m, how much could internal clearances also be reduced without negatively affecting line performance?

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Red lines show 420 kV system currently and by the time upgrade is completed in 2030. re-dimensions insulation Norwegian Utility Re-Dimensioned Insulation in Voltage Upgrade Project nor 2 300x219
Red lines show 420 kV system currently and by the time upgrade is completed in 2030.
Fig. 1: Portion of typical 300 kV ‘V’ string extended by 4 discs. re-dimensions insulation Norwegian Utility Re-Dimensioned Insulation in Voltage Upgrade Project nor 3 300x195
Fig. 1: Portion of typical
300 kV ‘V’ string extended by 4 discs.

 

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Relying on ‘smart’ engineering methods based on a probabilistic approach and supported by precise data about insulators and air gaps, it turned out that most towers on Statnett’s 300 kV network did have just enough space to make the upgrade feasible. In the case of other towers, however, depending on wind, icing, line temperature, geography and line angles, the constraints proved too tight and different solutions had to be identified.

Insulator Performance

1. Pollution & Icing Tests

The two main environmental stresses considered when selecting line insulation in Norway are icing and pollution and the resulting traditional insulation solution on Statnett 300 kV lines has involved glass insulator strings. These were preferred because they were deemed the best choice in regard to performance under icing and also in terms of low maintenance requirements combined with long expected service life. Moreover, since it was desired to conduct as much as possible of the upgrade to 420 kV under live working conditions, the most cost-effective strategy was, wherever possible, to simply increase the length of glass strings. Given the rationale discussed above for seeking to minimize this required extension of existing insulators, a series of ice and pollution tests were carried out at STRI in Sweden. Laboratory test procedures were specially developed to simulate local environmental conditions and these methods were deemed to adequately represent Statnett’s service environment. This ensured that test results would indeed be applicable for use in any statistical-based method for insulator dimensioning (according to IEC 60815-1) – now available in a proprietary, easy-to-use software called Line Performance Estimator (LPE).

Fig. 2: Typical 300 kV tower at Statnett. re-dimensions insulation Norwegian Utility Re-Dimensioned Insulation in Voltage Upgrade Project nor4 287x300
Fig. 2: Typical 300 kV tower at Statnett.

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Icing tests were performed according to the widely accepted Ice Progressive Stress (IPS) methodology (developed by STRI in collaboration with Statnett and the Swedish grid operator, Svenska Kraftnät) and which has now been included in the IEEE Standard 1783-2009. These tests were performed over a broad range of melting water conductivities, from 100 to 300 µS/cm, so as to establish 50% flashover voltage levels. Solid Layer Method tests were then performed according to IEC 60507 and modified to comply with the low levels of NSDD measured on insulators removed from service in Norway. Again, 50% flashover voltages were obtained across a broad range of salt deposit densities, from 0.03 to 0.16 mg/cm2.

The laboratory tests were performed on the specific type of glass cap & pin insulator shell currently used on most of Statnett’s 300 kV network. Pollution and icing tests were also performed on other types of glass shells as well as on composite insulators. This allowed a database to be created of comparative results, which could find use one day in future projects. Recently, similar test results were also obtained for RTV-coated insulators and also simulating wet snow conditions.

Fig. 3: Insulator set-up for icing tests  re-dimensions insulation Norwegian Utility Re-Dimensioned Insulation in Voltage Upgrade Project nor7 300x262
Fig. 3: Insulator set-up for icing tests
Fig. 4: Close up of insulator string with ice accretion re-dimensions insulation Norwegian Utility Re-Dimensioned Insulation in Voltage Upgrade Project nor6 154x300
Fig. 4: Close up of insulator string with ice accretion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As a basis for applying the statistical dimensioning method, results from the pollution and icing test were then expressed in the form of flashover performance curves where the key parameters in the calculation included: U50 – voltage level with a 50% flashover probability; l – axial length of the insulator; g – pollution or ice severity; A and a – experimental constants derived from the tests.

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Results from this program of testing confirmed that the number of insulator discs in strings on uprated lines could be reduced from 18 to 17 if applying deterministic insulation dimensioning. Moreover, if relying on statistical insulation dimensioning, it was found that it could even prove acceptable to use only 16 discs on a limited number of 420 kV towers.

B. Lightning & Switching Performance of Insulators & Air Gaps

With the expected pollution and icing performance of insulators on upgraded lines established, Statnett engineers turned their attention to air gaps as well as lightning and switching performance. The key parameters to resolve in this regard were the minimum clearances required not to jeopardize line performance as well as what distance was needed to ensure no flashovers would occur to tower parts such as guy wires. To answer these questions, lightning and switching impulse tests were carried out on a model of a full-scale tower set up at Graz University of Technology in Austria. Actual gap factors – relating flashover voltage of the actual gap to that of a standard rod-plane gap – were established for the different air gaps of suspension towers, e.g. across the string, as well as between phase conductor and tower or guy wire given different insulator swing angles. It turned out that actual gap factors for Statnett suspension towers were greater than typical values presented in the standards and this provided a valuable margin utilized in the upgrade. For a standard ‘I’ string configuration, this meant that clearances required for ‘no wind’ conditions could be reduced by about 10%.

In the case of tension towers, it was important to determine the optimal position of the conductor bundle in relation to cross-arms and guy wires. For safety reasons, it was deemed preferable that the majority of flashovers should take place between conductor and cross-arm. Test results confirmed that this was the case for about 80% of all recorded flashovers if the conductor bundle was placed so that the distance from it to the guy wire equaled that from the corona ring to the cross-arm.

Statistical Insulation Coordination

With expected insulator performance under pollution, icing, lightning and switching known and gap factors confirmed, Statnett engineers looked to statistical coordination (in place of standard ‘black or white’ deterministic methods) and used the LPE program to calculate future performance of the upgraded 420 kV lines.

Fig. 5a: Tower window in upright position for testing flashover voltage across insulator string re-dimensions insulation Norwegian Utility Re-Dimensioned Insulation in Voltage Upgrade Project nor8 300x268
Fig. 5a: Tower window in upright position for testing flashover voltage across insulator string
Fig. 5b: Tower window tilted for testing flashover voltage between conductor and tower leg or guy wire re-dimensions insulation Norwegian Utility Re-Dimensioned Insulation in Voltage Upgrade Project nor9 192x300
Fig. 5b: Tower window tilted for testing flashover voltage between conductor and tower leg or guy wire.

 

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To predict line performance, this program relies on data such as:

• system voltage
• annual number of pollution and icing event
• pollution and ice severity
• ground flash density
• soil resistivity
• tower footing resistance
• geometric data for insulator strings (e.g. position of arcing horn, length of hardware)
• tower geometry
• gap factors for lightning and switching impulse in outer and center phases and across insulator strings.

Fig. 5c: Full scale model of tension tower for flashover testing re-dimensions insulation Norwegian Utility Re-Dimensioned Insulation in Voltage Upgrade Project nor11 300x166
Fig. 5c: Full scale model of tension tower for
flashover testing.

In general, during the course of any voltage upgrade project it becomes necessary to optimize use of available tower top clearances and certain trade-offs may have to be made. In the case of the Statnett upgrade, these can best be explained with the help of Fig. 6, which represents a ‘screen dump’ of the LPE program outcome when applied to this project. For example, assuming that insulator string length would be shortened by 10 cm versus the optimal selected value (corresponding to -0.1 in the X-axis versus 0.0), the number (or %) of failures due to pollution or icing would increase. At the same time, lightning and switching performance would decrease because of larger available air gaps. As such, one of the keys during any voltage upgrade is to find the insulator length and matching air clearances that ensure the least number of failures and best overall line performance. Moreover, since tower designs in Norway often vary due to changes in local topography, this optimal solution for Statnett had to be tailor-made for every specific type of tower while at the same time considering overall line performance, which of course was the main goal.

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Fig. 7: Presentation of calculated performance of uprated line using Line Performance Estimator. re-dimensions insulation Norwegian Utility Re-Dimensioned Insulation in Voltage Upgrade Project nor12 300x203
Fig. 7: Presentation of calculated performance of uprated line using Line Performance Estimator.

In fact, based on experience from projects such as the Statnett upgrade, the functionality of the LPE program was extended to also make use of data imported from the design software for each individual tower type. Such data includes conductor position, insulator length and calculated tower top clearance under different wind loading conditions. This would then allow lightning, switching, power frequency, pollution and icing performance all to be evaluated for every different tower. In this manner, the statistical insulation performance for the complete upgraded line could be optimized.

Indeed, using results from the LPE, Statnett line designers were able to verify calculated lightning, switching, pollution and icing performance results against targets set for the whole line in terms of e.g. acceptable number of failures per 100 km/year. If these targets could not be satisfied, line designers could then identify which specific tower types were responsible for inferior performance and propose appropriate remedial measures. Figure 7 shows how the result calculated for a particular section of line is presented as a pie chart as well as how performance for five selected towers is depicted.

Fig. 6: Screen dump of Line Performance Estimator (LPE) program. Fault contribution (in %) for different causes of outages. re-dimensions insulation Norwegian Utility Re-Dimensioned Insulation in Voltage Upgrade Project nor13 278x300
Fig. 6: Screen dump of Line
Performance Estimator (LPE) program. Fault contribution (in %)
for different causes of outages.

For enhanced lightning performance in the case of the Statnett upgrade, the primary action would be to replace ‘I’ strings with ‘V’ strings. If that were not possible, improved tower grounding or installation of line surge arresters would be considered. Line arresters could also be an option should switching performance need to be improved. Similarly, inferior pollution performance could be overcome in a variety of ways, such as by installing ‘V’ strings, composite insulators or by using longer glass strings. Icing performance could be improved by e.g. specifying insulator designs with large shed spacing.

Summary

Statnett has become involved in one of the world’s largest voltage upgrading projects. Since the intent was to utilize existing towers and conductors to the maximum, there was only limited margin in terms of extending insulator strings and allowing greater air clearances. Insulation coordination also had to be performed precisely since available clearance margins were very small. Using statistics-based engineering methods combined with findings from extensive testing on insulators and air gaps, it was deemed feasible to uprate existing 300 kV lines to 420 kV in a cost-effective manner and with relatively small added visual impact – all accomplished using live line working methods. Insulator string length and internal clearances were kept as small as possible while not sacrificing overall line performance. To be able to make proper use of such precise engineering methods, several R&D projects had to be performed but, in retrospect, this proved money well invested.